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An Example of an Identification Bar on an Aerial Photo



The ID bar (here highlighted in yellow on the photo above for easy recognition) along the top edge of this photo is typical of many photo identification methods.

The text is broken up into three separate parts: First, the date field "2-27-74", stating that this photo was shot on February 2, 1974; next come the roll and frame numbers, "2 60", meaning the sixtieth photo on the second roll of film for the given project; and lastly, the code designating the project for which the pictures were taken, in this case "GS-VDJT".

The amount of information and the method of its arrangement is not always the same from source to source, however.  There is no industry standard for the labeling of photography, and how and what data is put on an identification bar is often decided by either the company taking the pictures or the company's client.  Not every photo will have the data laid out in the arrangement shown above, therefore, and not all of this same information will even be listed on every photo.

This is why it is important to quote to us all of the information listed on an ID bar when trying to ascertain the availability of a photo already known to exist.


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